Cognitive Behavioral Therapist supporting clients, CBT students, practitioners, and clinicians.  elisanebolsine.com

What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a problem-focused type of intervention. Rather than an in-depth focus on past experience, CBT seeks to teach children to become their own therapist. CBT helps kids recognize their thought patterns and identify where and when those patterns help and where and when they hurt. Using problem-solving strategies and skill-building techniques the child, parent, and therapist work together to change dysfunctional thoughts and replace them with more proactive thoughts and behaviors.

 
 
Divider%2B-%2BTeal.jpg
 

How did CBT get started?

Aaron Beck developed CBT in the 1960s, drawing from his and others’ experiences with Freudian therapy. Dr. Beck began his psychiatric career as an analyst and set up studies to show the effectiveness of psychoanalytic treatment (Freudian therapy). He was unable to show that psychoanalytic treatment was an effective intervention for depression. But from his research, Dr. Beck began to develop what is now known as CBT. Since then, hundreds of research studies have found CBT to be an effective treatment for mood disorders, and the discipline has also evolved considerably beyond the original focus of depression. Research has since shown highly effective results for anxiety, self-esteem, anger management, personality disorders, and more.

What research supports CBT?

There are literally thousands of research studies that support the effectiveness of CBT with youth. The three major federally-funded youth studies are:

CBT has been found to be most effective with mood disorders like anxiety and depression. CBT has not been as effective with AD/HD and other behavioral disorders (parent training and behavioral therapy generally works best with those issues).

How does CBT work?

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a problem-focused type of intervention. Rather than an in-depth focus on past experience, CBT seeks to teach children to become their own therapist.

CBT helps kids recognize their thought patterns and identify where and when those patterns help and where and when they hurt. Using problem-solving strategies and skill-building techniques the child, parent, and therapist work together to change dysfunctional thoughts and replace them with more proactive thoughts and behaviors.

Are parents involved in the process?

Yes! Although as kids get older they get more input as to the amount of involvement of their parents. Young adults often choose not to have supporting adults involved in their treatment at all.

Is there homework?

Yes! CBT emphasizes collaboration and ongoing effort outside of the therapy session. Children will regularly be assigned homework to increase their awareness of their own feelings. They will often need some assistance from their parents to help identify and record this information. Studies have clearly shown that people who actively practice and record information outside of the sessions have better results.

How long does therapy take?

The major research studies have mostly used 18-20 sessions in the CBT protocols. In my practice I have found that a useful number to cite, although many people do not need that many sessions, and many clients who continue on beyond 20 sessions.

Do you take my insurance?

No. I am not in-network for any insurance companies. However, I do provide a monthly receipt with all of the codes necessary for you to submit your claims to your insurance company for out- of-network coverage. The amount your insurance company reimburses you is determined by your plan.

What are your fees?

Please see link to services here.

How do I pay?

You can pay by credit card (including Health Savings Account cards) or check. I invoice on a monthly basis.

What do I tell my child about starting therapy?

I started my first website because of this question. I wanted kids to be able to see a picture of me and my office before they came in. A lot of times kids have all kinds of misinformation about what therapy is, but my site can at least show them me and the space we will meet in. I recommend letting your child know that my job as a therapist is to work with kids and teens to help them with worries or sadness- whatever the issue is that is getting in the way for them. I also recommend letting them know that I have done this work for a long time, and I will not judge them or be surprised by anything they say. We work together to figure out how to help them feel better.

 
 
Divider%2B-%2BTeal.jpg
 

 Visit Our Resource Library for Free Downloads and Book Recommendations

 
 
 
Divider+-+Teal.jpg